SSC Reading Comprehension Questions with Answers

Reading Comprehension

An excellent collection of SSC Reading comprehension questions and answers with detailed explanations for competitive exams. Given below are some of the most repeated practice questions on English Reading comprehension for SSC CGL, CHSL, JE, GD constable, Stenographer, MTS, and CPO exams. Go through this very important online quiz based on model and previous year asked questions from SSC Reading comprehension with solutions to ace the exam.

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Instructions

A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Genetic variation is the cornerstone of evolution, without which there can be no natural selection, and so a low genetic diversity decreases the ability of a species to survive and reproduce, explains lead author Yoshan Moodley, Professor at the Department of Zoology, University of Venda in South Africa.

Two centuries ago, the black rhinoceros - which roamed much of sub Saharan Africa - had 64 different genetic lineages; but today only 20 of these lineages remain, says the paper. The species is now restricted to five countries, South Africa, Namibia, Kenya, Zimbabwe and Tanzania. Genetically unique populations that once existed in Nigeria, Cameroon, Chad, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, Mozambique, Malawi and Angola have disappeared. The origins of the 'genetic erosion' coincided with colonial rule in Africa and the popularity of big game hunting. From the second half of the 20th century, however, poaching for horns has dramatically depleted their population and genetic diversity, especially in Kenya and Tanzania.

Question 1

From the second half of the 20th century what has caused a dramatic fall in black rhinoceros population?

Question 2

Genetically unique black rhinoceros has been lost in all of the following countries, except?

Instructions

A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Manja, or the glass-coated string used for flying kites, not only poses threat to humans, animals and birds but also to trees. A study by the country's oldest botanical garden has revealed that it poses a great threat to trees. But how can a snapped string struck in a tree kill the tree? Apparently, it does so by allying with the creepers in the garden.

A research paper by three scientists of the Acharya Jagdish Chandra Bose Indian Botanic Garden, located in West Bengal's Howrah district, illustrates in detail how the manja, in collusion with climbers, does the damage. "The abandoned, torn kite strings act as an excellent primary supporting platform for the tender climbers, giving easy passage to reach the top of the trees. Lateral branches from the top of the climber and other accessory branches from the ground reaches the top taking support of the first climber, completely covers the treetop, thus inhibiting the penetration of sunlight," says the research paper.

Question 3

What gives easy passage to 'climbers' to top of the trees?

Instructions

You have brief passage with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

What, one wonders, is the lowest common denominator : of Indian culture today? The attractive Hema Malini? The songs of vividh Bharati? Or the mouth-watering Masala Dosa? Delectable as these may be, each yields pride of place to that false (?) symbol of a new era - the synthetic fibre. In less than twenty years the nylon sari and the terylene shirt have swept the countryside, penetrated to the farthest comers of the land and persuaded every common man, woman and child that the key to success in the present day world lies in artificial fibres: glass nylon, crepe nylon, tery mixes, polyesters and what have you. More than the bicycles, the wristwatch or the transistor radio, synthetic clothes have come to represent the first step )' away from the village square. The village lass treasures the e flashy nylon sari in her trousseau most lovingly; the village youth gets a great kick out of his cheap terry cot shirt and u trousers, the nearest he can approximate to the expensive s synthetic sported by his wealthy city bred contemporaries. And the Neo-rich craze for 'phoren' is nowhere more apparent a than in the price that people will pay for smuggled, stolen, begged or borrowed second hand or thrown away synthetics. Alas, even the unique richness of the traditional tribal costume is being fast eroded by the deadening uniformity of nylon.

Question 4

'The lowest common denominator' of the Indian culture today is

Instructions

A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Manja, or the glass-coated string used for flying kites, not only poses threat to humans, animals and birds but also to trees. A study by the country's oldest botanical garden has revealed that it poses a great threat to trees. But how can a snapped string struck in a tree kill the tree? Apparently, it does so by allying with the creepers in the garden.

A research paper by three scientists of the Acharya Jagdish Chandra Bose Indian Botanic Garden, located in West Bengal's Howrah district, illustrates in detail how the manja, in collusion with climbers, does the damage. "The abandoned, torn kite strings act as an excellent primary supporting platform for the tender climbers, giving easy passage to reach the top of the trees. Lateral branches from the top of the climber and other accessory branches from the ground reaches the top taking support of the first climber, completely covers the treetop, thus inhibiting the penetration of sunlight," says the research paper.

Question 5

How many scientists contributed to a study by country's oldest botanical gardens on how manja can kill a tree?

Question 6

How can a tree be killed by a creeper?

Question 7

What would be the acronym for India's oldest botanical garden?

Question 8

Abandoned, torn kite strings stuck in trees benefits whom?

Instructions

A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Genetic variation is the cornerstone of evolution, without which there can be no natural selection, and so a low genetic diversity decreases the ability of a species to survive and reproduce, explains lead author Yoshan Moodley, Professor at the Department of Zoology, University of Venda in South Africa.

Two centuries ago, the black rhinoceros - which roamed much of sub Saharan Africa - had 64 different genetic lineages; but today only 20 of these lineages remain, says the paper. The species is now restricted to five countries, South Africa, Namibia, Kenya, Zimbabwe and Tanzania. Genetically unique populations that once existed in Nigeria, Cameroon, Chad, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, Mozambique, Malawi and Angola have disappeared. The origins of the 'genetic erosion' coincided with colonial rule in Africa and the popularity of big game hunting. From the second half of the 20th century, however, poaching for horns has dramatically depleted their population and genetic diversity, especially in Kenya and Tanzania.

Question 9

What is important for evolution?

Question 10

Sub Sharan Africa has lost how many black rhino genetic lineages in 200 years?

Instructions

You have brief passage with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Most people who bother with the matter at all would admit that the English language is in a bad way, but it is generally assumed that we cannot by conscious action do anything about it. Our civilization is decadent and our language - so the argument runs - must inevitably share in the general collapse. It follows that any struggle against the abuse of language is a sentimental archaism, like preferring candles to electric light or hansom cabs to aeroplanes. Underneath this lies the half-conscious belief that language is a natural growth and not an instrument which we shape for our own purposes.Now it is clear that the decline of a language must ultimately have political and economic causes: it is not due simply to the bad influence of this or that individual writer. But an effect can become a cause, reinforcing the original cause and producing the same effect in an intensified form, and so on indefinitely. A man may take to drink because he feels himself to be a failure, and then fail all the more completely because he drinks. It is rather the same thing that is happening to the English language. It becomes ugly and inaccurate because our thoughts are foolish, but the slovenliness of our language makes it easier for us to have foolish thoughts. The point is that the process is reversible. Modern English, especially written English, is full of bad habits which spread by imitation and which can be avoided if one is willing to take the necessary trouble. If one gets rid of these habits, one can think more clearly, and to think clearly is a necessary first step towards political regeneration; so the fight against bad English is not frivolous and is not the exclusive concern of professional writer.

Question 11

The author believes that.

Instructions

A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Genetic variation is the cornerstone of evolution, without which there can be no natural selection, and so a low genetic diversity decreases the ability of a species to survive and reproduce, explains lead author Yoshan Moodley, Professor at the Department of Zoology, University of Venda in South Africa.

Two centuries ago, the black rhinoceros - which roamed much of sub Saharan Africa - had 64 different genetic lineages; but today only 20 of these lineages remain, says the paper. The species is now restricted to five countries, South Africa, Namibia, Kenya, Zimbabwe and Tanzania. Genetically unique populations that once existed in Nigeria, Cameroon, Chad, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, Mozambique, Malawi and Angola have disappeared. The origins of the 'genetic erosion' coincided with colonial rule in Africa and the popularity of big game hunting. From the second half of the 20th century, however, poaching for horns has dramatically depleted their population and genetic diversity, especially in Kenya and Tanzania.

Question 12

Genetic diversity is proportional to __________.

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