SSC Stenographer 7th Feb 2019 Shift-II

Instructions

For the following questions answer them individually

Question 181

Select the most appropriate synonym of the given word.
EMINENT

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Question 182

Select the alternative that will improve the underlined part of the sentence. In case there is no improvement required, select "No improvement".
You must have a hard life when you were a little boy.

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Question 183

Select the correct active form of the given sentence.
Did you hear what was said by her?

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Instructions

Read the following passage and answer the questions.
Passage:

Sixteen-year-old Rajni made her way to meet her teammates after her 3-0 win over Ragini Upadhyay of Uttar Pradesh in the women's 46 kg final of the $$2^{nd}$$ Junior Women Boxing Championship at the Chandigarh University. After accepting the congratulatory messages, she soon headed to the milk booth corner outside the hall. She gulped down a glass of milk. Then she carefiilly wrapped her medal in a cloth and put it in her bag. She wanted to make sure that the medal was carefully kept till she was able to present it to her father Jasmer Singh. Rajni knows the daily struggle her father goes through to ensure that she can box. He spends 12 hours a day selling lassi in Panipat for Rs 8 a glass. The medal, the girl from Buana Lakhu knows, will make her father extremely happy. "I am the third of six siblings. My father starts his day even before I wake up. He collects lassi from the village homes and travels from our village in Buana Lakhu to Panipat on his bike to sell it. When I showed interest in boxing, he supported me. I trained under coach Surinder Malik sir. I would box with old gloves. At times there was not enough food for three full meals but my mother would. make some ghee from left-over curd," Rajni says. Rajni started training wider coach Malik at the Phul Singh Memorial Boxing Club at her village. With more than 50 girls training at the village, Rajni had no dearth of partners. Last year. the youngster became the national champion in 46 Kg category in the 1st BFI Junior Nationals at Dehradun.
This year, the youngster won the gold medal in the Nations Junior Cup in Serbia, where she defeated Russian Anastasia Kiriyenko. It was also the first time that Rajni had travelled abroad. Father Jasmer Singh recalls how nervous he was when Rajni travelled to Serbia. As for Rajni, her wish is to meet six-time World champion Mary Kom. "I have always idolised Mary Kom didi and she is an inspiration for all the boxers. Maybe, one clay I can win another gold medal and she will hand me the gold medal. That day will be like winning in Olympics for me," Rajni says.

Question 184

What is Rajni's ultimate wish?

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Question 185

After winning the medal in Chandigarh what did Rajni do first?

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Question 186

At which place did Rajni alt her coaching in boxing?

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Question 187

Which of the following is not indicative of the poverty of Rajni's family?

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Question 188

Which place Rajni does Rajni belong to?

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Instructions

Read the following passage and answer the questions.
Passage:
Rajendran belongs to the hula tribe, one of India's oldest indigenous communities, who live along the north-eastern coast of the state of Tamil Nadu. They are known for their ancient and intimate knowledge of snakes, and their skills form an important but nearly invisible part of the healthcare system in India.
"Many people are scared of snakes," Rajendran said, "But we must remember that the snake is only interested in survival. If we move in agitation, the snake perceives a threat and can strike. If we stand still, however, it will often slither away." We were at the offices of the hula Snake Catchers Industrial Co-Operative Society, which was formed in 1978 in Vadanemmeli to capture snakes and extract their venom. Nearly 50,000 people die of snakebites each year in the country, and the only reliable treatment is the prompt administration of anti-venom. Six companies across India produce around 1.5 million vials of anti-venom annually, and most of it is derived from the venom extracted by the Indas.
Rajendran showed us a sunken sandpit enclosed by a low brick wall A high thatched roof protected the space from the sun. and a small raised platform in the centre of the pit had a simple blackboard with details of the snakes being held in the facility. This was the venom extraction site.
We aren't holding too many snakes right now," he said, pointing to the numerous rows of empty clay pots, neatly arranged outside the thatch structure. Each pot will be half-filled with sand before housing two snakes each, and the mouth of the pot will be carefully sealed with porous cotton cloth so that the snakes can't leave the pot but there is still enough air.
The co-operative has official licenses to hold about 800 snakes at a time. "We keep every snake for 21 days, and extract venom four times during that period," Rajendran said. The snakes are then released into the wild. A small mark on their belly scales prevents the same snake from being caught repeatedly. "The mark goes away after a few moultings."
Rajendran's confidence in handling snakes and his deep understanding of these creatures are derived from a childhood spent in the forests and scrublands of the region. Before he turned 10. he had seen hundreds of snakes being captured. The Imlas usually work in silence, even when they go into the forest with others. They instinctively know the significance of faint signs on the ground to either follow clues or dismiss them. However, they often find it hard to articulate the details of their understanding, even to people who study reptiles.

Question 189

What is the best way to save yourself when a snake is near you?

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Question 190

After the venom has been fully extracted from a snake, what happens to the snake?

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