Reasoning Questions For IBPS RRB Clerk

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reasoning questions for ibps rrb clerk
reasoning questions for ibps rrb clerk

Reasoning Questions For IBPS RRB Clerk

Download Top-20 IBPS RRB Clerk Reasoning Questions PDF. Reasoning questions based on asked questions in previous year exam papers very important for the IBPS RRB Assistant exam.

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Instructions

In making decisions about important questions, it is desirable to be able to distinguish between ‘strong’ arguments and ‘weak’ arguments so far as they relate to the question. ‘Strong’ arguments are those which are both important and directly related to the questions. ‘Weak’ arguments are those which are of minor importance and also may not be directly related to the questions or may be related to a trivial aspect of the question. The question below is followed by two arguments numbered I and II. You have to decide which of the arguments is a ‘strong’ argument and which is a ‘weak’ argument.

Give answer a: if only argument I is strong
Give answer b: if only argument II is strong
Give answer c: if either I or II is strong.
Give answer d: if neither I nor II strong.
Give answer e: if both I and II are strong.

Question 1: Should all the power generation and distribution units in the State Y be handed over to the private sector ?
Arguments :
I. Yes, the State Government are not equipped to handle generation and distribution of electricity efficiently and it is not bene cial too.
II. Yes, The private companies handle generation and distribution of electricity efficiently.

a) if only argument I is strong

b) if only argument II is strong

c) if either I or II is strong.

d) if neither I nor II strong.

e) if both I and II are strong.

Instructions

<p “=””>Below are given two passages followed by several possible inferences which can be drawn from the facts stated in the passages. You have to examine each inference separately in the context of the passage and decide upon its degree of truth or falsity.
Mark answer (1) if inference is “definitely true”, i.e., it properly follows from the statement of facts given.
Mark answer (2) if the inference is“probably true” though not “definitely true” in the light of the facts given.
Mark answer (3) if the “Data are inadequate”, i.e., from the facts given you cannot say whether the inference is likely to be true or false.
Mark answer (4) if the inference is “probably false” though not “definitely false” in the light of the facts given.
Mark answer (5) if the inference is “definitely false”, i.e., it cannot possibly be drawn from the facts given or it contradicts the given facts. <p “=””>PASSAGE II
In the initial years, trade policy in our country was primarily aimed at regulating imports having regard to the nascent stage of country’s development and the need to encourage domestic production through import substitution measures. However, with the onset of liberalisation the importance of globalisation through trade and making exports the engine of growth of economy has been recognised. Export promotion is now a continuous and sustained effort and specific steps in this direction have been taken and achievements have been made in recent years.

Question 2: Import used to affect domestic production in earlier years.

a) if inference is “definitely true”, i.e., it properly follows from the statement of facts given.

b) if the inference is “probably true” though not “definitely true” in the light of the facts given.

c) if the “Data are inadequate”, i.e., from the facts given you cannot say whether the inference is likely to be true or false.

d) if the inference is “probably false” though not “definitely false” in the light of the facts given.

e) if the inference is “definitely false”, i.e., it cannot possibly be drawn from the facts given.

Question 3: Before the implementation of the idea of liberalisation, our trade policy was not much in favour of free import-export.

a) if inference is “definitely true”, i.e., it properly follows from the statement of facts given.

b) if the inference is “probably true” though not “definitely true” in the light of the facts given.

c) if the “Data are inadequate”, i.e., from the facts given you cannot say whether the inference is likely to be true or false.

d) if the inference is “probably false” though not “definitely false” in the light of the facts given.

e) if the inference is “definitely false”, i.e., it cannot possibly be drawn from the facts given

Question 4: It is not appropriate to give the credit of economic growth to export.

a) if inference is “definitely true”, i.e., it properly follows from the statement of facts given.

b) if the inference is “probably true” though not “definitely true” in the light of the facts given.

c) if the “Data are inadequate”, i.e., from the facts given you cannot say whether the inference is likely to be true or false.

d) if the inference is “probably false” though not “definitely false” in the light of the facts given.

e) if the inference is “definitely false”, i.e., it cannot possibly be drawn from the facts given

Question 5: At present, there are no regulatory clutches on the export as export is recognised as the main force behind economic growth.

a) if inference is “definitely true”, i.e., it properly follows from the statement of facts given.

b) if the inference is “probably true” though not “definitely true” in the light of the facts given.

c) if the “Data are inadequate”, i.e., from the facts given you cannot say whether the inference is likely to be true or false.

d) if the inference is “probably false” though not “definitely false” in the light of the facts given.
e) if the inference is “definitely false”, i.e., it cannot possibly be drawn from the facts given

Question 6: Achievements made in the economic growth are attributable to maximum possible export and minimum or almost negligible import.

a) if inference is “definitely true”, i.e., it properly follows from the statement of facts given.

b) if the inference is “probably true” though not “definitely true” in the light of the facts given.

c) if the “Data are inadequate”, i.e., from the facts given you cannot say whether the inference is likely to be true or false.

d) if the inference is “probably false” though not “definitely false” in the light of the facts given.

e) if the inference is “definitely false”, i.e., it cannot possibly be drawn from the facts given

Instructions

Below are given two passages followed by several possible inferences which can be drawn from the facts stated in the passages. You have to examine each inference separately in the context of the passage and decide upon its degree of truth or falsity.

<p “=””>Mark answer (1) if inference is “definitely true”, i.e., it properly follows from the statement of facts given.
Mark answer (2) if the inference is “probably true” though not “definitely true” in the light of the facts given.
Mark answer (3) if the “Data are inadequate”, i.e., from the facts given you cannot say whether the inference is likely to be true or false.
Mark answer (4) if the inference is “probably false” though not “definitely false” in the light of the facts given.
Mark answer (5) if the inference is “definitely false”, i.e., it cannot possibly be drawn from the facts given

or it contradicts the given facts. PASSAGE I
Logically these are rules of conduct. Every country has laid down comprehensive series of practical rules for citizens for resolving mutual contradictory rights and interests. Most of these rules have been laid down to sustain social activities. For instance, many countries have laid down rules to protest against such unsocial activities as theft, attack and murder. These rules are backed by judicial system and executionary institutions, which look after the people who obey the rules and also who violate the rules. Wherever the human behaviour is involved such rules are not only for namesake there but are necessary also.

Question 7: There are no rules in countries where citizens’ interests and rights do not contradict.

a) if inference is “definitely true”, i.e., it properly follows from the statement of facts given.

b) if the inference “probably true” though not “definitely true” in the light of the facts given.

c) if the “Data are inadequate”, i.e., from the facts given you cannot say whether the inference is likely to be true or false.

d) if the inference is “probably false” though not “definitely false” in the light of the facts given.

e) if the inference is “definitely false”, i.e., it cannot possibly be drawn from the facts given

Question 8: Without rules, human behaviour degenerates into anarchy.

a) if inference is “definitely true”, i.e., it properly follows from the statement of facts given.

b) if the inference “probably true” though not “definitely true” in the light of the facts given.

c) if the “Data are inadequate”, i.e., from the facts given you cannot say whether the inference is likely to be true or false.

d) if the inference is “probably false” though not “definitely false” in the light of the facts given.

e) if the inference is “definitely false”, i.e., it cannot possibly be drawn from the facts given

Question 9: Human beings are susceptible to violate rules.

a) if inference is “definitely true”, i.e., it properly follows from the statement of facts given.

b) if the inference “probably true” though not “definitely true” in the light of the facts given.

c) if the “Data are inadequate”, i.e., from the facts given you cannot say whether the inference is likely to be true or false.

d) if the inference is “probably false” though not “definitely false” in the light of the facts given.

e) if the inference is “definitely false”, i.e., it cannot possibly be drawn from the facts given

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Question 10: There is no need of any rules if individuals do not have to interact with each other.

a) if inference is “definitely true”, i.e., it properly follows from the statement of facts given.

b) if the inference is “probably true” though not “definitely true” in the light of the facts given.

c) if the “Data are inadequate”, i.e., from the facts given you cannot say whether the inference is likely to be true or false.

d) if the inference is “probably false” though not “definitely false” in the light of the facts given.

e) if the inference is “definitely false”, i.e., it cannot possibly be drawn from the facts given

Instructions

Study the following information carefully and answer the questions that follow.

As Input-Output is given in different steps. Some mathematical operation is done in each step and No mathematical operation is repeated.

As per the rules followed in the steps given above, find out in each of the following questions the appropriate step for the given input.

Question 11: What is the average between 1st digit of 1st block and 2nd digit of 2nd block in Step 2?

a) 3

b) 2.5

c) 1.5

d) 4

e) None of these

Question 12: What is the sum of the two numbers obtained in Step 3?

a) 5

b) 2

c) 3.5

d) 12

e) None of these

Question 13: Which of the following is the second digit of the second block in Step 2?

a) 0

b) 5

c) 3

d) 2

e) None of these

Question 14: What is the number which is obtained in the final step?

a) 1

b) 2.5

c) 1.75

d) 1.5

e) None of these

Question 15: Which of the following will be the product of first digit of first block and second digit of third block in Step 1?

a) 21

b) 14

c) 0

d) 4

e) None of these

Instructions

An arrangement machine when given an input of numbers and words rearranges them following a rule. Below is an example of such rearrangement.
Input: all 35 their 49 children 91 monday 65 to 27 schools 3 from 70 mathematics 39
Step 1:to 3 all 35 their 49 children 91 monday 65 27 schools from 70 mathematics 39
Step 2: to 3 all 70 35 their 49 children 91 monday 65 27 schools from mathematics 39
Step 3:to 3 all 70 from 35 their 49 children 91 monday 65 27 schools mathematics 39
Step 4:to 3 all 70 from 35 their 27 49 children 91 monday 65 schools mathematics 39
Step 5:to 3 all 70 from 35 their 27 monday 91 49 children 65 schools mathematics 39
This process goes on till the end
Now perform the same operations if the following string is given to this machine
Input: dominique 72 acetylcholine 48 mother evangeline 68 christopher 29 communications 87 16 philadelphia 37 hilbert 51

Question 16: How many words are present between dominique and acetylcholine in the final output ?

a) 0

b) 1

c) 2

d) 3

e) 4

Question 17: In step 2 what is the sum of the numbers in the second half of all terms ?

a) 221

b) 227

c) 229

d) 231

e) 245

Instructions

Ten colleagues named A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J are sitting on two linear rows of chairs, both facing each other. They all belong to Mumbai, Patna, New Delhi, Bangalore, Hyderabad, Chandigarh, Jaipur, Kolkata, Chennai, Guwahati (not in that order). Each person is facing someone else. The cities New Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai and Kolkata are called metros. It is also known that :
Only one person from the metros sits in the corner. Only one pair of people facing each other are from metros. H from Kolkata faces C from New Delhi. A and B sit in the corner in the same row. The person from Bangalore is the immediate neighbour of the person from New Delhi and the person from Chennai. A from Mumbai and the person from Kolkata sit next to each other. I faces the person from Hyderabad. D has both the neighbours from a metro.The people from Chandigarh and Jaipur sit on corners in the same side. J sits immediately to the right of the person facing the person second to the right of I. The person from Guwahati does not sit in the corner. The person from New Delhi sits second to the right of the person facing E.

Question 18: If I and G sit next to each other, who sits opposite to the person from Mumbai ?

a) G

b) H

c) F

d) A

e) E

Question 19: People from which group of cities are sitting in the corner ?

a) Jaipur, Chandigarh, Guwahati, Hyderabad

b) Jaipur, Chandigarh, Mumbai, Patna

c) Guwahati, Jaipur, Bangalore, Patna

d) Chandigarh, New Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai

e) Cannot be determined

Question 20: If C is the immediate neighbour of the person from Chandigarh, who faces B ?

a) F

b) H

c) J

d) E

e) Cannot be determined

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Answers & Solutions:

1) Answer (D)

2) Answer (A)

The inference is repetition of the phrase : encourage domestic production through import substitution measures.

Thus, the inference is “definitely true”.

=> Ans – (A)

3) Answer (A)

The word ‘regulating imports’ makes the inference that before the implementation of the idea of liberalisation, the trade policy was not much in favour of free import-export definitely true

Thus, the inference is “definitely true”.

=> Ans – (A)

4) Answer (E)

The inference is contradicting the tenor of the passage : making exports the engine of growth of economy has been recognised.

Thus, the inference is “definitely false”.

=> Ans – (E)

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5) Answer (B)

Specific steps in this direction have been taken and achievements have been made in recent years. Hence it appears that the presence of regulatory clutches in not likely.

Thus, the inference is “probably true”.

=> Ans – (B)

6) Answer (D)

Although emphasis is given on export promotion in the passage, but almost negligible import may not be good for economic growth.

Thus, the inference is “probably false”.

=> Ans – (D)

7) Answer (C)

Comparative situation is not given in the passage.

Thus, the “Data is inadequate”.

=> Ans – (C)

8) Answer (A)

The rules exist to ensure smooth and proper functioning of social life. In the absence of rules, a state of disorder due to lack of control may happen.

Thus, inference is “definitely true”.

=> Ans – (A)

9) Answer (A)

The assumption is that human beings are susceptible to violate rules. Otherwise why is there a need for rules of conduct.

Thus, inference is “definitely true”.

=> Ans – (A)

10) Answer (B)

Most of these rules have been laid down to sustain social activities. So, it appears from the tenor of the passage that they are not necessary if there is no social activity, i.e. interaction among people.

Thus, the inference is “probably true”.

=> Ans – (B)

11) Answer (A)

Step 1 is obtained by addition of product of 1st digit of 1st block and 2nd digit of 4th block and product of 2nd digit of 1st block and 1st digit of 4th block. This block will be first block of Step 1. Similarly, This process repeats for 2nd and 3rd blocks also.
Eg: 1st and 4th blocks of the given question are 79 and 19.
⇒ 7*9+9*1 = 63+9 = 72 which is the first block of Step 1.
Same process repeats for 2nd – 5th blocks and 3rd – 6th blocks.

First block of Step 2 is formed by addition of all first digits of Step 1 and Second block of Step 2 is formed by addition of all second digits of Step 1.
Eg: All first digits of Step 1 are 7, 5 and 3. Sum = 7+5+3 = 15
All second digits of Step 1 are 2, 3 and 0. Sum = 2+3+0 = 5

First block of Step 3 is formed by the product of 1st digit of 1st block and 2nd digit of 2nd block. Second digit of Step 3 is formed by the product of 2nd digit of 1st block and 1st digit of 2nd block.
Eg: 1st digit of 1st block and 2nd digit of 2nd block are 1 and 5. Product = 1*5 = 5.
2nd digit of 1st block and 1st digit of 2nd block are 5 and 0. Product = 5*0 = 0

Step 4 is formed by taking the average of the two numbers in Step 3.
Eg: Average of the two numbers in Step 3 is (5+0)/2 = 2.5

Here, 1st digit of 1st block and 2nd digit of 2nd block in Step 2 are 1 and 5 respectively.
Hence, The required average = (1+5)/2 = 6/2 = 3.

12) Answer (A)

Step 1 is obtained by addition of product of 1st digit of 1st block and 2nd digit of 4th block and product of 2nd digit of 1st block and 1st digit of 4th block. This block will be first block of Step 1. Similarly, This process repeats for 2nd and 3rd blocks also.
Eg: 1st and 4th blocks of the given question are 79 and 19.
⇒ 7*9+9*1 = 63+9 = 72 which is the first block of Step 1.
Same process repeats for 2nd – 5th blocks and 3rd – 6th blocks.

First block of Step 2 is formed by addition of all first digits of Step 1 and Second block of Step 2 is formed by addition of all second digits of Step 1.
Eg: All first digits of Step 1 are 7, 5 and 3. Sum = 7+5+3 = 15
All second digits of Step 1 are 2, 3 and 0. Sum = 2+3+0 = 5

First block of Step 3 is formed by the product of 1st digit of 1st block and 2nd digit of 2nd block. Second digit of Step 3 is formed by the product of 2nd digit of 1st block and 1st digit of 2nd block.
Eg: 1st digit of 1st block and 2nd digit of 2nd block are 1 and 5. Product = 1*5 = 5.
2nd digit of 1st block and 1st digit of 2nd block are 5 and 0. Product = 5*0 = 0

Step 4 is formed by taking the average of the two numbers in Step 3.
Eg: Average of the two numbers in Step 3 is (5+0)/2 = 2.5

Here, The numbers in Step 3 are 5 and 0.
Hence, The required sum = 5+0 = 5.

13) Answer (B)

Step 1 is obtained by addition of product of 1st digit of 1st block and 2nd digit of 4th block and product of 2nd digit of 1st block and 1st digit of 4th block. This block will be first block of Step 1. Similarly, This process repeats for 2nd and 3rd blocks also.
Eg: 1st and 4th blocks of the given question are 79 and 19.
⇒ 7*9+9*1 = 63+9 = 72 which is the first block of Step 1.
Same process repeats for 2nd – 5th blocks and 3rd – 6th blocks.

First block of Step 2 is formed by addition of all first digits of Step 1 and Second block of Step 2 is formed by addition of all second digits of Step 1.
Eg: All first digits of Step 1 are 7, 5 and 3. Sum = 7+5+3 = 15
All second digits of Step 1 are 2, 3 and 0. Sum = 2+3+0 = 5

First block of Step 3 is formed by the product of 1st digit of 1st block and 2nd digit of 2nd block. Second digit of Step 3 is formed by the product of 2nd digit of 1st block and 1st digit of 2nd block.
Eg: 1st digit of 1st block and 2nd digit of 2nd block are 1 and 5. Product = 1*5 = 5.
2nd digit of 1st block and 1st digit of 2nd block are 5 and 0. Product = 5*0 = 0

Step 4 is formed by taking the average of the two numbers in Step 3.
Eg: Average of the two numbers in Step 3 is (5+0)/2 = 2.5

Hence, The second digit of Second block in Step 2 is 5.

14) Answer (B)

Step 1 is obtained by addition of product of 1st digit of 1st block and 2nd digit of 4th block and product of 2nd digit of 1st block and 1st digit of 4th block. This block will be first block of Step 1. Similarly, This process repeats for 2nd and 3rd blocks also.
Eg: 1st and 4th blocks of the given question are 79 and 19.
⇒ 7*9+9*1 = 63+9 = 72 which is the first block of Step 1.
Same process repeats for 2nd – 5th blocks and 3rd – 6th blocks.

First block of Step 2 is formed by addition of all first digits of Step 1 and Second block of Step 2 is formed by addition of all second digits of Step 1.
Eg: All first digits of Step 1 are 7, 5 and 3. Sum = 7+5+3 = 15
All second digits of Step 1 are 2, 3 and 0. Sum = 2+3+0 = 5

First block of Step 3 is formed by the product of 1st digit of 1st block and 2nd digit of 2nd block. Second digit of Step 3 is formed by the product of 2nd digit of 1st block and 1st digit of 2nd block.
Eg: 1st digit of 1st block and 2nd digit of 2nd block are 1 and 5. Product = 1*5 = 5.
2nd digit of 1st block and 1st digit of 2nd block are 5 and 0. Product = 5*0 = 0

Step 4 is formed by taking the average of the two numbers in Step 3.
Eg: Average of the two numbers in Step 3 is (5+0)/2 = 2.5

Hence, The number obtained in final step is 2.5

15) Answer (C)

Step 1 is obtained by addition of product of 1st digit of 1st block and 2nd digit of 4th block and product of 2nd digit of 1st block and 1st digit of 4th block. This block will be first block of Step 1. Similarly, This process repeats for 2nd and 3rd blocks also.
Eg: 1st and 4th blocks of the given question are 79 and 19.
⇒ 7*9+9*1 = 63+9 = 72 which is the first block of Step 1.
Same process repeats for 2nd – 5th blocks and 3rd – 6th blocks.

First block of Step 2 is formed by addition of all first digits of Step 1 and Second block of Step 2 is formed by addition of all second digits of Step 1.
Eg: All first digits of Step 1 are 7, 5 and 3. Sum = 7+5+3 = 15
All second digits of Step 1 are 2, 3 and 0. Sum = 2+3+0 = 5

First block of Step 3 is formed by the product of 1st digit of 1st block and 2nd digit of 2nd block. Second digit of Step 3 is formed by the product of 2nd digit of 1st block and 1st digit of 2nd block.
Eg: 1st digit of 1st block and 2nd digit of 2nd block are 1 and 5. Product = 1*5 = 5.
2nd digit of 1st block and 1st digit of 2nd block are 5 and 0. Product = 5*0 = 0

Step 4 is formed by taking the average of the two numbers in Step 3.
Eg: Average of the two numbers in Step 3 is (5+0)/2 = 2.5

In Step 1, 1st digit of 1st block is 7 and 2nd digit of 3rd block is 0.
Hence, The required product = 7*0 = 0

16) Answer (D)

In the above given series, the number of letters in a word and sum of the digits of the numbers are arranged in ascending order in each step one word and one number in each step so similarly for the input: dominique 72 acetylcholine 48 mother evangeline 68 christopher 29 communications 87 16 philadelphia 37 hilbert 51
We have
Step 1:mother 51 dominique 72 acetylcholine 48 evangeline 68 christopher 29 communications 87 16 philadelphia 37 hilbert
Step 2:mother 51 hilbert 16 dominique 72 acetylcholine 48 evangeline 68 christopher 29 communications 87 philadelphia 37
Step 3:mother 51 hilbert 16 dominique 72 evangeline 37 acetylcholine 48 68 christopher 29 communications 87 philadelphia
Step 4: mother 51 hilbert 16 dominique 72 evangeline 37 christopher 29 acetylcholine 48 68 communications 87 philadelphia
Step 5:mother 51 hilbert 16 dominique 72 evangeline 37 christopher 29 philadelphia 48 acetylcholine 68 communications 87
Required answer is 3

17) Answer (A)

In the above given series, the number of letters in a word and sum of the digits of the numbers are arranged in ascending order in each step one word and one number in each step so similarly for the input: dominique 72 acetylcholine 48 mother evangeline 68 christopher 29 communications 87 16 philadelphia 37 hilbert 51
We have
Step 1:mother 51 dominique 72 acetylcholine 48 evangeline 68 christopher 29 communications 87 16 philadelphia 37 hilbert
Step 2:mother 51 hilbert 16 dominique 72 acetylcholine 48 evangeline 68 christopher 29 communications 87 philadelphia 37
Step 3:mother 51 hilbert 16 dominique 72 evangeline 37 acetylcholine 48 68 christopher 29 communications 87 philadelphia
Step 4: mother 51 hilbert 16 dominique 72 evangeline 37 christopher 29 acetylcholine 48 68 communications 87 philadelphia
Step 5:mother 51 hilbert 16 dominique 72 evangeline 37 christopher 29 philadelphia 48 acetylcholine 68 communications 87
Correct answer is sum of 68+29+87+37=221

18) Answer (C)

We know that H from Kolkata faces C from New Delhi. We also know that since only pair of people from the metros face each other, there is no other pair of people looking at each other who are both from metros.

We also know A and B sit on the corners of the same row and we see that A sits next to the person from Kolkata ie H.

Thus, the arrangement will look like this :

We have assumed that the person on the top row faces down and the person from the bottom row faces up.

The person from Bangalore is the immediate neighbour of the person from New Delhi and the person from Chennai. We know that C is from New Delhi, so it means that the person from Bangalore sits between the person from New Delhi ie H and the person from Chennai. Now the arrangement will look like this :

D has both the neighbours from a metro, which is possible only if D is the person from Bangalore. Since the people from Jaipur and Chandigarh sit on corners, we know that they will be the ones on the corners of the top row. The person from New Delhi sits second to the right of the person facing E which means that E will be facing the person who is second to the left of C ie the person from New Delhi. Now the arrangement will look like this :

J sits immediately to the right of the person facing the person second to the right of I. This condition means that I can be in two places : facing D or facing E. We know that I faces the person from Hyderabad and since D is from New Delhi, we can say that I faces E who is from Hyderabad. We also know that the person from Guwahati is not sitting at the corners, ie he/she is facing D. Therefore, we can say that B is from Patna (only city left). Now the arrangement will look like this :

Since we know the names of the two people left, we can further say that :

From the figure, we can see that if G sits next to I then F will sit opposite A who is from Mumbai.

19) Answer (B)

We know that H from Kolkata faces C from New Delhi. We also know that since only pair of people from the metros face each other, there is no other pair of people looking at each other who are both from metros.

We also know A and B sit on the corners of the same row and we see that A sits next to the person from Kolkata ie H.

Thus, the arrangement will look like this :

We have assumed that the person on the top row faces down and the person from the bottom row faces up.

The person from Bangalore is the immediate neighbour of the person from New Delhi and the person from Chennai. We know that C is from New Delhi, so it means that the person from Bangalore sits between the person from New Delhi ie H and the person from Chennai. Now the arrangement will look like this :

D has both the neighbours from a metro, which is possible only if D is the person from Bangalore. Since the people from Jaipur and Chandigarh sit on corners, we know that they will be the ones on the corners of the top row. The person from New Delhi sits second to the right of the person facing E which means that E will be facing the person who is second to the left of C ie the person from New Delhi. Now the arrangement will look like this :

J sits immediately to the right of the person facing the person second to the right of I. This condition means that I can be in two places : facing D or facing E. We know that I faces the person from Hyderabad and since D is from New Delhi, we can say that I faces E who is from Hyderabad. We also know that the person from Guwahati is not sitting at the corners, ie he/she is facing D. Therefore, we can say that B is from Patna (only city left). Now the arrangement will look like this :

Since we know the names of the two people left, we can further say that :

From the figure, we can see that the people from Option B are the ones sitting in the corner.

20) Answer (E)

We know that H from Kolkata faces C from New Delhi. We also know that since only pair of people from the metros face each other, there is no other pair of people looking at each other who are both from metros.

We also know A and B sit on the corners of the same row and we see that A sits next to the person from Kolkata ie H.

Thus, the arrangement will look like this :

We have assumed that the person on the top row faces down and the person from the bottom row faces up.

The person from Bangalore is the immediate neighbour of the person from New Delhi and the person from Chennai. We know that C is from New Delhi, so it means that the person from Bangalore sits between the person from New Delhi ie H and the person from Chennai. Now the arrangement will look like this :

D has both the neighbours from a metro, which is possible only if D is the person from Bangalore. Since the people from Jaipur and Chandigarh sit on corners, we know that they will be the ones on the corners of the top row. The person from New Delhi sits second to the right of the person facing E which means that E will be facing the person who is second to the left of C ie the person from New Delhi. Now the arrangement will look like this :

J sits immediately to the right of the person facing the person second to the right of I. This condition means that I can be in two places : facing D or facing E. We know that I faces the person from Hyderabad and since D is from New Delhi, we can say that I faces E who is from Hyderabad. We also know that the person from Guwahati is not sitting at the corners, ie he/she is facing D. Therefore, we can say that B is from Patna (only city left). Now the arrangement will look like this :

Since we know the names of the two people left, we can further say that :

If C is the immediate neighbour of the person from Chandigarh, we know that the person on the other corner of the row is from Jaipur. However, we cannot be certain whom among F and G is from Chandigarh and Jaipur. Thus, the answer is cannot be determined.

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