Reading Comprehension Questions For SSC GD PDF

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reading comprehension questions for ssc gd pdf
reading comprehension questions for ssc gd pdf

Reading Comprehension Questions For SSC GD PDF

SSC GD Constable Reading Comprehension Question and Answers download PDF based on previous year question paper of SSC GD exam. 10 Very important Reading Comprehension questions for GD Constable.

READING COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS FOR SSC GD PDF

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Instructions

Read the given passage carefully and select the best answer to each question out of the four given alternatives.

Has NASA, the monolithic space agency, failed in it’s quest to put man out into the cosmos. Will profit coupled with mans need to explore be the driving engine which sends man into the cosmos. Think about what has moved technology forward within the American society over the past 100 years or so. Was Orville and Wilbur Wright employed by the government. Of course not. Most of their research and development for the invention of the airplane took place within a small bike shop in western Dayton, Ohio, the birth place of aviation. Thomas Edison, who is accredited with 1,093 patents earning him the nickname “The Wizard of Menlo Park” used his own money to build the Menlo Park research labs in New Jersey. In 1889 Thomas Edison established the Edison General Electric Company. Thomas Edison is considered the most prolific inventor of our time and his inventions were created within the realm of private enterprise. Did the seed for the invention of the personal computer germinate within a government lab. The invention of the personal computer came from an assortment of various inventions and from the tinkering of Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak in Job’s garage in an area now called Silicon Valley. Their tinkering led to the development of Apple Computers. The story of Bill Gates and the development of the Microsoft family of operating systems took place within private enterprise. The Windows family of operating systems is the most widely used on earth and has been a major player in bringing information technology to the developed world.

Examples of major technological advancement within the realm of private enterprise are numerous. Most major technological advancements within society have occurred outside the purview of government intervention. Governments were intended to govern the people. The government’s role is to preserve the environment of freedom and democracy so that intellectual curiosity can flourish within this environment. The governments role is also to provide funding, and should not be in the nuts and bolts operation of putting man into space. The ingenuity of man within the realm of private enterprise has resulted in most of the technological advancements we enjoy today.

Question 1: Which of the following is a correct match?

a) Bill Gates – Aviation

b) Steve Jobs – Operating System

c) Thomas Edison – Information Technology

d) None of the above

Question 2: Which of the following is not a role played by the government as given in the passage?

a) To provide funding for the inventions.

b) To preserve the liberal order.

c) To facilitate the freedom of expression.

d) To put man into space

Question 3: What is the meaning of the word ‘monolithic’ as per the context of the passage?

a) ancient

b) unique

c) subjugating

d) very large and powerful

Question 4: Who is known as ‘The Wizard of Menlo Park’?

a) Orville Wright

b) Wilbur Right

c) Thomas Edison

d) Steve Jobs

Question 5: What is the main idea of the passage?

a) Private enterprises are better than the government, when it comes to inventions.

b) Private enterprises have played an important role in many significant inventions.

c) Though private enterprises facilitated, it has been the government which is the driving force behind major inventions

d) Private enterprises are technologically more advanced than the government.

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Instructions

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow:

In the Snark, as in the Alice books of 1865 and 1871, the commonsense assumptions that usually govern language and meaning are turned upside down. It makes us wonder what all of those assumptions are up to, and how they work. How do we know that this sentence is trying to say something serious, or that where we are now is not a dream?

Language can’t always convey meaning alone – it might need sense, which is the governing context that framed it. We talk about ‘common sense’, or whether something ‘makes sense’, or dismiss things as ‘nonsense’, but we rarely think about what sense itself is, until it goes missing. The German logician Gottlob Frege in 1892 used sense to describe a proposition’s meaning, as something distinct from what it denoted. Sense therefore appears to be a mental entity, resistant to fixed definition.

Shortly after Carroll’s death in 1898, a seismic turn took place in both logic and metaphysics. Building on Frege, logical positivists such as Bertrand Russell sought to deploy logic and mathematics in order to establish unconditional truths. A logical truth was, like mathematics, true whether or not people changed their minds about it. Realism, the belief in a mind-independent reality, began to assert itself afresh after a long spell in the philosophical wilderness.

Sense and nonsense would therefore become landmines in a battle over logic’s ability to untether truth from thought. If an issue over meaning seeks recourse in sense, it seeks recourse in thought too. Carroll anticipated where logic was headed, and the strangest of his creations was more than a game, an experiment conceived, as the English author G K Chesterton once wrote of his work, ‘in order to study that darkest problem of metaphysics’.

Nina Lyon

This article was originally published at Aeon and has been republished under Creative Commons.

Question 6: All of the following statements are true except

a) We do not think about sense unless it goes missing.

b) In the Alice books, the commonsense assumptions are turned upside down.

c) The strangest creation of Carroll was just a game.

d) Russell used maths and logic to establish unconditional truths.

Question 7: We can infer from the given passage that

a) unconditional truths and realism are at loggerheads with each other.

b) realism believes in the existence of a mind-independent reality.

c) realism does not use logic and mathematics to establish its existence.

d) Russell was a believer in unconditional truths but did not believe in realism.

Question 8: We can ascertain that all of the following persons worked in the space of ‘logic and metaphysics’ except

a) Gottlob Frege

b) Bertnard Russelll

c) Chesterton

d) Carroll

Question 9: Which of the following is a valid inference that can be made on reading the passage?

a) A seismic event occurred shortly after Carroll’s death in 1898.

b) Frege used a preposition to describe the meaning of sense.

c) Carroll wrote that he conceived the experiment to study the darkest problem of metaphysics.

d) Sense is different from what it denotes, just like a preposition.

Question 10: Which of the following statements best captures the idea discussed in the second paragraph of the passage?

a) We lack the ability to distinguish the difference between ‘common sense’ and ‘nonsense’ when the feeling of ‘sense’ goes missing.

b) When the meaning of something is combined with the sense (i.e, the context), a language is born.

c) Frege was a pioneer in defining ‘sense’ and before his period, sense was considered as something resistant to definition.

d) Sense, along with language, plays a pivotal role in conveying the meaning of something.

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Instructions

Read the given passage carefully and select the best answer to each question out of the four given alternatives.

Vedanta summarises the metaphysics of the Upanishads, a clutch of Sanskrit religious texts, likely written between 800 and 500 BCE. They form the basis for the many philosophical, spiritual and mystical traditions of the Indian sub-continent. The Upanishads were also a source of inspiration for some modern scientists, including Albert Einstein, Erwin Schrödinger and Werner Heisenberg, as they struggled to comprehend quantum physics of the 20th century.

The Vedantic quest for understanding begins from what it considers the logical starting point: our own consciousness. How can we trust conclusions about what we observe and analyse unless we understand what is doing the observation and analysis? The progress of AI, neural nets and deep learning have inclined some modern observers to claim that the human mind is merely an intricate organic processing machine – and consciousness, if it exists at all, might simply be a property that emerges from information complexity. However, this view fails to explain intractable issues such as the subjective self and our experience of qualia, those aspects of mental content such as ‘redness’ or ‘sweetness’ that we experience during conscious awareness. Figuring out how matter can produce phenomenal consciousness remains the so-called ‘hard problem’.

Question 11: Which of the following do we experience during conscious awareness?

a) farsightedness

b) laziness

c) brightness

d) kindness

Question 12: Which of the following is true as per the passage?

a) Vedanta gives importance to consciousness.

b) Modern observers give importance to consciousness.

c) Vedanta does not give importance to consciousness.

d) Both Vedanta and modern observers give importance to consciousness.

Question 13: What is the meaning of the word ‘intricate’?

a) helpful

b) complicated

c) necessary

d) relevant

Question 14: What does ‘they’ refer to in the line “They form the basis for the many philosophical, spiritual and mystical traditions of the Indian sub-continent.”

a) Upanishads

b) Vedanta

c) Religious Texts

d) Metaphysics

Question 15: Which of the following scientists made a significant contribution to the Upanishads?

a) Albert Einstein and Erwin Schrödinger only

b) Erwin Schrödinger and Werner Heisenberg only

c) Albert Einstein, Erwin Schrödinger, and Werner Heisenberg

d) None of the above

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Instructions

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow:

Cryptocurrencies had a rough ride in 2018. As of January 7, 2018, the total market capitalization of all cryptocurrencies tracked by CoinMarketCap.com came to more than$800 billion, its highest point ever. As I write this on January 3, 2019, that total market capitalization is down to about $130 billion — about 1/6th of the market’s high point.

You might be surprised to learn that I’m still a cryptocurrency fan. But, just to be up front, yes, I am.

Not because I’m sitting on a huge pile of the stuff, nor because I expect to make a killing speculating.

I’m still enthusiastic about cryptocurrency because I’ve seen what it can do and make plausible predictions about what it will be able to do in the future. Cryptocurrency seizes control of money from governments and puts it in the hands of people. With improvements in its privacy aspects, that’s only going to become more true. In short, cryptocurrency fuels freedom.

But can it last? Will it win? I think that the last year, far from dispelling that notion, reinforces it. Let me explain.

Two kinds of noise related to cryptocurrency seem to have faded in tandem with the market cap’s downward trend. As one might expect, the ultra-bullish “Bitcoin will go to $100,000 real soon now!” voices have gone down in number and volume. But so have the voices comparing cryptocurrency to a Ponzi scheme or to the 17th century “tulip bubble.”

Yes, there are exceptions. One is Nobel-winning economist Paul Krugman, who still seems to think that transaction costs and lack of “tethers” to fiat government currencies will make crypto a bad bet. Of course, Krugman also said, in 1998, that “[b]y 2005 or so, it will become clear that the Internet’s impact on the economy has been no greater than the fax machine’s.” So however expert he may be in other areas, I doubt I’m alone in discounting his predictive abilities when it comes to technological advancements.

Question 16: Which of the following statements can be said to be true going by the author’s opinion of Paul Krugman?

a) The author believes that Paul Krugman is not an expert in any area, let alone digital markets.

b) The author is of the view that Paul Krugman made a correct prediction about the impact of internet.

c) The author doubts the predictive abilities of Krugman in technological advancements provided his track record in the space.

d) The author thinks that he is the only one who is doubting the predictive abilities of Krugman on the impact of technological advancements.

Question 17: What does the author mean by the line “ I think that the last year, far from dispelling that notion, reinforces it”?

a) The author believes that the last year’s downturn has reinforced the notion that cryptocurrencies will fade out soon.

b) The author believes that the downturn last year has counter-intuitively helped to reinforce the notion that cryptocurrencies are here to stay.

c) The last year’s downturn has raised a lot of questions regarding the future of cryptocurrency and has strengthened the fears that people had.

d) The author believes that the downturn has unfortunately strengthened the notions that cryptocurrency was supposed to dispel.

Question 18: According to the passage, cryptocurrency

a) seizes money from the Government and puts it in the hands of the people.

b) is similar to a ponzi scheme and the Tulip bubble of 17th century.

c) is all set to hit the $100,000 mark in a short while.

d) is not linked to government backed fiat currencies.

Question 19: Which of the following statements can be said to be true using the information provided in the passage?

a) Cryptocurrencies reached their highest market capitalization on the 7th of January, 2018.

b) The price of cryptocurrencies has declined consistently over the last year.

c) The market capitalization of the cryptocurrencies traded on CoinMarketCap.com reached $800 billion on the 7th of January, 2018.

d) The number of cryptocurrencies on the 3rd of January, 2019 is nearly a sixth of what it was on the 7th of January, 2018.

Question 20: Why is the author positive about cryptocurrency?

a) The value of cryptocurrencies increased by more than 6 times their original value last year.

b) The author has a hordes of cryptocurrencies and plans to make money by betting on future prices.

c) The author believes that the value of crytocurrency will rise exponentially in the near future.

d) The author is convinced of the potential that crypocurrencies hold and believes that they promote freedom.

Answers & Solutions:

1) Answer (D)

Bill Gates is related to Information Technology and Operating System.
Thomas Edison is related to Electric inventions.
Steve Jobs is related to Apple Computers.
So, none of the given pairs is correctly matched.
Hence, option D is the correct answer.

2) Answer (D)

From the second paragraph, we can infer that that the author does not want the government to put man into space.
Hence, option D is the correct answer.

3) Answer (D)

‘Monolithic’ means very large and powerful. Here, it is used as an adjective for NASA.
Hence, option D is the correct answer.

4) Answer (C)

From the first paragraph, we can see that Tomas Edison’s nickname is ‘The Wizard of Menlo Park’.
Hence, option C is the correct answer.

5) Answer (B)

Throughout the passage, with the use of several examples, the author has focussed on how private enterprises have played a major role in some of the greatest inventions in the history of the mankind. Option B is the closest.
Hence, option B is the correct answer.

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6) Answer (C)

The author mentions that Chesterton did not consider Carroll’s strangest creation to be a game. He says that his strangest creation was a thought experiment which was more than a game. Therefore, option C cannot be said to be true and hence, option C is the right answer.

7) Answer (B)

The passage hints a positive relation between the establishment of unconditional truths and realism. It does not pit them against each other. Therefore, we can eliminate option A. Options C and D cannot be inferred from the information given in the passage. The author has not mentioned how realism establishes itself or that Russell did not believe in realism. We can eliminate these options.

Option B states that realism believes in the existence of a mind-independent reality. Option B can be inferred from the last line of the penultimate paragraph of the passage. Therefore, option B is the right answer.

8) Answer (C)

The passage gives us details about the work of Frege, Russell, and Carroll. The author explains the contribution of each of these luminaries. The author just mentions that Chesterton, an author, described Carroll’s work. We cannot infer whether Chesterton worked in the space of ‘logic and metaphysics’. Therefore, option C is the right answer.

9) Answer (D)

’A seismic turn’ is used to describe the paradigm shift that happened. Option A uses the literal meaning and hence, can be eliminated.

Chesterton wrote that Carroll conceived an experiment to study the darkest problem of metaphysics, not Carroll. We can eliminate option C as well.

The author states that Frege defined sense just like a preposition, something different from what it denotes. Therefore, we can infer option D and hence, option D is the right answer.

10) Answer (D)

Through the second paragraph, the author tries to establish the importance of sense in conveying the meaning. He states that the language, in itself, might be inadequate to convey a meaning when the context (sense) is missing. Therefore, option D is the right answer.

11) Answer (C)

According to the examples provided in the passage, we can experience brightness through our conscious awareness.
Hence, option C is the correct answer.

12) Answer (A)

From the beginning of the second paragraph, we can infer that Vedanta gives importance to consciousness. However, it is also given that some of the modern observers give little importance to consciousness.
Hence, option A is the correct answer.

13) Answer (B)

‘Intricate’ means very complicated or detailed.
Hence, option B is the correct answer.

14) Answer (A)

‘They’ refers to the Upanishads.
Hence, option A is the correct answer.

15) Answer (D)

None of the given scientists had any contribution to the Upanishads. Rather Upanishads were a source of inspiration for them.
Hence, option D is the correct answer.

16) Answer (C)

The author doubts only the ability of Krugman to make predictions in the technology space. He does not make any statement doubting Krugman’s capabilities in other fields. Therefore, we can eliminate option A.

The author ‘doubts’ he is the only one wary of Krugman’s predictive abilities in the space. The author conveys that there are many others who share his views. Therefore, we can eliminate option D.

The author uses Krugman’s prediction about the impact of internet to establish that Krugman is not good at predicting about the impact of technological advancements. We can eliminate option B as well. Therefore, option C is the right answer.

17) Answer (B)

The author states that the downturn has helped to strengthen the facts about the longetivity and credibility of the cryptocurrencies. The author believes that the downturn has helped to silence both over-bullish and over-bearish opinions, improving the credibility enjoyed by the cryptocurrencies in the process. Therefore, option B is the right answer.

18) Answer (D)

Cryptocurrency seizes the control of money from the Government, not the money itself. We can eliminate option A.

Option B states that cryptocurrencies are similar to the ponzi schemes and the Tulip bubble. The author states that last year’s downturn has helped to silence such opinions. Therefore, we can eliminate option B as well. We can eliminate option C too since the author states that the downturn has silenced the over-bullish predictions as well.

Option D can be inferred from the fact that Krugman cites the detachment between cryptocurrencies and the Government based cryptocurrencies as one of cons of cryptocurrencies. Krugman’s conclusion on the fact can be wrong, but the fact, in itself, cannot be wrong. Therefore, option D is the right answer.

19) Answer (A)

It cannot be said that the price of cryptocurrencies has declined consistently over the past 1 year. The only information we have is the price of currencies at 2 points of time. Therefore, we can eliminate option B.

The market capitalization of all the cryptocurrencies reached $800 billion on the 7th of January, 2018, not just the ones traded on CoinMarketCap.com. We can eliminate option C as well.

Option D states that the number of cryptocurrencies have become a sixth of what it was a year before. However, no detail has been given about the number of cryptocurrencies in circulation. Option D can be eliminated as well.

Option A can be inferred from the line “the total market capitalization of all cryptocurrencies tracked by CoinMarketCap.com came to more than$800 billion, its highest point ever”. Therefore, option A is the right answer.

20) Answer (D)

The author states that he is positive about crytocurrencies since they shift the control of money from the governments to the people. The author is of the view that cryptocurrencies promote freedom. Therefore, option D is the right answer.

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