Reading Comprehension Questions For IBPS RRB Clerk

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reading comprehension questions for ibps rrb clerk
reading comprehension questions for ibps rrb clerk

Reading Comprehension Questions For IBPS RRB Clerk

Download Top-20 IBPS RRB Clerk Reading Comprehension Questions PDF. Reading Comprehension questions based on asked questions in previous year exam papers very important for the IBPS RRB Assistant exam

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Instructions

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain parts are given in bold to answer some of the questions based on the passage.

If you saw a book in Barnes and Noble called “How Not to Go to War,” wouldn’t you assume it was a guide to the proper equipment every good warrior should have when they head off to do a little killing, or perhaps something like this U.S. news article on “How Not to Go to War Against ISIS” which is all about what law you should pretend authorizes a violation of the UN Charter and the Kellogg-Briand Pact?

In fact, the new book, How Not to Go to War by Vijay Mehta, comes to us from Britain where the author is a leading peace activist, and it is actually a set of recommendations for how to not go to war at all ever. While many books spend their larger first section on a problem and a shorter concluding part on solutions, the first two-thirds of Mehta’s book is about solutions, the last third about the problem of war. If this confuses you, or if you’re unaware that war is a problem, you can always read the book in reverse order. Even if you are aware of war as a problem, you still may benefit from Mehta’s description of how technology, including artificial intelligence, is creating horrific new possibilities for wars worse than we’ve seen or even imagined.

Then I recommend that the reader jumps to Chapter Five, toward the end of the book’s first part, because it presents a solution for how we might think and speak better about economics and government spending, a solution that simultaneously illuminates what is wrong with our current way of thinking.

Imagine there’s a billionaire who “earns” a lot of money each year and spends a lot. Now, imagine that this billionaire hires a super-expert accountant who figures out a way to add to the positive side of the ledger whatever amount the billionaire spends on fences and alarm systems and guard dogs and bullet-proof SUVs and private guards with tasers and handguns. This billionaire brings in $100 million and spends $150 million, but $25 million is on “security” expenses, so that moves over to the income side of things. Not he’s bringing in $125 million and spending $125 million. Make sense?

Of course, it doesn’t make sense! You can’t get paid $100 million, spend $100 million on guns, and now have $200 million. You haven’t doubled your money; you’re broke, buddy. But this is exactly how an economist calculates a nation’s gross (and I mean gross) domestic product (GDP). Mehta proposes a change, namely that weapons-making, war industries, not be counted in GDP.

This would reduce the U.S. GDP from some $19 trillion to $17 trillion, and help visitors from Europe understand why the place looks so much poorer than the high priests of economics tell us it is. It might even help politician from Washington D.C. understands why voters they believe to be doing so well are so amazingly angry and outraged.

Question 1: Why does the author cite the example of the “billionaire spending on security”?

a) It presents a solution for how we might think and speak better about economics and government spending.

b) It explains GDP calculation.

c) It explains how billionaires spend their money.

d) It exposes the futile spending we do.

e) It illuminates what is wrong with our current way of thinking.

Question 2: Why does the author recommend Mehta’s book even to those aware of war?

a) To emphasize on war as a problem.

b) To show them a new way of looking at war.

c) To expose them to new possibilities of war.

d) To ask them to spread the message to prevent war.

e) All of the above

Question 3: As per the passage how is the format of the book being talked about different from other books?

a) This book is actually a set of recommendations for how to not go to war at all ever while the others are not.

b) This book dedicates a larger part to solutions than problems.

c) This book is useful for even those who already know about war.

d) Both A and B

e) None of the above

Instructions

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words are printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

One can make a pretty good case that while the history of the United States reveals great and enduring innovations in business and industry, one could also argue that U.S. history is a history of war. Depending on one’s working definition of war, without doing any research I identify thirteen wars involving the U.S. Our government claims that all of these were not only necessary but also largely forced on us. From my perspective the first one seems a little “iffy,” one was definitely forced on us, and at least eleven were actually of our choosing even though our leaders claimed we had no choice.

Almost, without doubt, nearly all Americans would consider that we had no choice but to revolt against England and form a new country. Certainly, the Founders thought so. And perhaps, in the long run, it was inevitable. But were the “facts” at the time so clear that we had to act how and when we did? We all know our Founders’ position on the subject, but is it possible that the political class in England also thought that the “facts” obviously justified their position? What was their position in their own eyes?

First, England believed and practised mercantilism at the time. Mercantilism assumes that the home country founded colonies for economic or military advantages for the home country, not especially for the colonists. While the American colonists were English citizens, it was a citizenship that in the eyes of England was a sort of “secondary” citizenship, one that placed the full obligations of citizenship on the American, without “really” providing them with all of the benefits in practice. The position of the colonists at that time was very much like that of Negroes in America, especially in the South, between the end of the Civil War and the 1960s.

The colonists complained about taxes. From England’s entirely rational point of view, it had recently spent a great deal of money protecting the colonies during the French and Indian Wars and considered it obvious that the colonies should bear some of the cost, so it enacted taxes to recover part of its war costs. From the colonists’ entirely rational point of view, they had fought side by side with the Crown’s troops and therefore owed nothing more for their “protection.” It was also true that the colonists had no input regarding taxation or much of anything else, and so complained about taxation without representation. While obvious to the colonists, this claimed lack of representation perplexed the government. It was, and still is, a common practice in England for subjects to be represented in Parliament by Members who did not actually live in the districts they represented. Someone somewhere in England was representing the colonists without residing there, so the colonist’s claims of taxation without representation had absolutely no merit. As the Crown’s total activities proved more and more costly, it levied more taxes on all its subjects, but not necessarily the same taxes on everyone. Thus, the Americans had to pay different taxes while subjects in other parts of the realm may have paid different taxes. Clearly each side thought its positions on the matters entirely logical and proper, and so they were to the respective sides.

The central fact that really mattered much more than bickering over taxes, representation, and so forth is the fact that the needs and desires of the colonists had evolved as the colonies had grown from barely functional outposts of the Empire to self-sustaining, reasonably prosperous enterprises. Their dependence on England had greatly declined in many ways, while their fiscal value to England had finally begun to pay dividends on the investment, time, and even blood the home country had expended on behalf of the colonies. I call the war between the American colonies and England “iffy” because given different attitudes on both sides they could have probably reached a solution to the real problems between them, but independence was probably unavoidable over the longer term. The position on the side of the Americans that they were “forced” into rebellion reflected their emotional involvement as well as legal and economic factors. So I’ll stick with “iffy.”

Question 4: How did the author vary on his stance on the nature of wars in the US history from that of the government?

a) He is of the opinion that the American leaders have rightly projected the nature of war.

b) He believes that although some wars were fought not by choice, it was not the same for all of them.

c) He thinks that all wars fought by US were indeed not a function of choice but unavoidable circumstances.

d) He believes that the wars fought by US in the past arose out of necessity to dominate the emerging world order.

e) None of these

Question 5: Which of the following reasons could have been actually responsible for the fallout between the Americans and the English?

a) The lack of adequate representation of the Americans in the Parliament of England.

b) The ill treatment of American colonists at the hands of their ruthless English counterparts.

c) The rising ambitions of the Americans who wished for more than a mere functional existence.

d) The disparity in the taxes levied on the Americans and the English

e) None of these

Question 6: How did the American colonists view the tax levy imposed on them by the English ?

a) Although initially they revolted but eventually acceded to the terms of the English.

b) The colonists found the levy of various taxes to be contradictory to their lack of representation in matters of government.

c) They viewed it as an oppression of their compliance with the English.

d) They sympathised with the plight of the English and considered the taxes to be justified.

e) None of these

Question 7: The sentence “England believed and practised mercantilism at the time.” in the passage may not be grammatically or contextually correct. Choose the most suitable alternative that will replace the statement to adhere to the grammatical syntax of the paragraph.

a) England had always believed and practised mercantilism at the time.

b) England had been believing and practicing mercantilism at the time.

c) England believed at and practised mercantilism at the time.

d) England believed in and practised mercantilism at the time.

e) None of these

Question 8: Which of the following statements is true according to the passage?

a) The American founders have for long deceived the general masses into believing in the role of America in its wars of the past.

b) The author’s family had been a victim of one of the wars.

c) England owes its economic prosperity in the past to mercantilism.

d) Neither the American colonists nor the English were flawed in their reasoning of justifying their stands.

e) None of these

Question 9: Which of the following best reflects the possible situation of the negroes in America during the period between the end of civil war and the 1960s?

a) Both the Negroes and the Whites were treated equal in the eye of the law.

b) The Negroes were paid better than the Whites.

c) The Negroes were levied taxes similar to those of the Whites but, the Negro children were could not access the school cafeteria which was exclusive to the Whites.

d) In case of a homicide, the Negroes were given death penalty.

e) None of these

Question 10: What does the word “iffy” mean in the context of the passage?

a) doubtful

b) credible

c) ingenuous

d) lackadaisical

e) None of these

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Instructions

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain parts are given in bold to answer some of the questions based on the passage.

They are indeed optimists, who know that cinemas are the true reflectors of society. From origin, cinemas act as the mirrors & simulate incidents that happen in society. Cinemas give not only recreation, entertainment but also create awareness, education and enthrall millions of people across the nation about the hidden aspects of the society & social prospect.

“A cinema stands for humanism, tolerance, for reason, for progress, for adventures of ideas and for the search of communal truth and reflects social aspects.” The earliest film of the world presented on screen named “La sortie des quvriers de l’usine Lumiere” is a true reflector of a factual story that happened in Paris which was directed by Lumiere Bros. The cinema in the world has remained a myth, inspite of the fact of reflecting the society, a stage came when film makers overcome the barrier by taking the trouble to match cinema stories close to society. “Cinemas in a community are like windows which looks out on broader, richer & deep things of life.

As all oriental societies, the Indian society too has been nourished on societal facts from mythology. Extracts from mythology closely related to happenings of society provide enough opportunities for the audience to exercise their originality, imagination & fantasy.

Great pioneer personalities such as Jamshadji Madan also took certain historical facts of society while making cinemas which had already audience. “World War II” a great movie with excellent momentum started to emerge as genre particularly on the subjects culture, heritage of the society of that times. Every community of the world has got its own peculiar social traditions, which denotes psychological makeup, social concepts and made of social behavior which are captured and explored by cinemas through out world. Many cinemas use past great political personalities for raising their momentum. “Alluri Sita Rama Raju” a film by super star Krishna was made to release in more than 100 countries with different languages gives a conducive personality who sacrificed his life in achieving independence reflects Indian societal scene. Relevance of many great scholastic people’s thoughts today is coming true through the world of cinema that reflects ancient & modern societal facts. “Cinema must alternate between revolution and consolidation; it is the function of society to supply this dynamic element.” The cinema such as “Titanic” which has its record in wreckage of ship is also a social & accidental phenomena. World’s least expensive film named “The shattered illusion” is also a natural phenomena of the society that includes spectacular scenes of ship being overwhelmed by a storm that took place near Victorial islands practically. Bollywood cinema such as “Mangal Pandae”, Ameer Khan as hero reflects the social, cultural, spiritual, communal aspects of Hindu mythology before Indian Independence.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com

 

Question 11: Given below is a sentence from the passage that may or may not be grammatically viable, choose the most suitable alternative that reflects the grammatically correct sentence. If the highlighted sentence does not require any corrections, choose option (e), i.e. “no correction required” as your answer choice.
Cinemas in a community are like windows which looks out on broader, richer & deep things of life.

a) Cinemas in a community are like windows which looks out on broader, richer & deeper things of life.

b) Cinemas in a community are like windows which look out on broader, richer & deeper things of life.

c) Cinemas in a community are like windows which look out on broader, richer & deep things of life.

d) Cinemas in a community are like windows which look out on broader, rich & deep things of life.

e) No correction required

Question 12: Which of the following is the same in meaning as ‘overwhelmed’?

a) controlled

b) lost

c) joyous

d) submerged

e) unique

Question 13: How has the Indian Society been nourished on societal facts from mythology?

a) Mythology remained the theme for Indian movies for many years.

b) Many movies have been made on mythological subjects.

c) Movies have been made on subjects which are extracts from mythology and which relate closely to the societal happenings.

d) Due to the firm belief on Indians in mythology, filmmakers chose to make movies on mythological subjects.

e) None of the above

Question 14: What was the theme of the movie “Alluri Sita Rama Raju”?

a) The life of a personality who sacrificed his life for independence of the country.

b) The second world war.

c) The ancient and modern societal facts.

d) Great political personalities of the past.

e) Great people’s scholastic thoughts.

Question 15: Which of the following is the world’s least expensive movie?

a) World War II

b) The Shattered Illusion

c) Alluri Sita Rama Raju

d) La sortie des quvriers de l’usine Lumiere

e) Mangal Pandae

Question 16: What is the main idea that the author wants to convey?

a) There is a complicated relationship between society and cinemas which is challenging to explain.

b) The plots of different films are so diverse that they cannot be tied in a single thread.

c) All cinemas are based on incidents from society.

d) Cinemas, being the reflectors of society, are more than what they actually are.

e) None of the above

Question 17: Which of the following can be inferred from the second paragraph?

a) Earlier the plots of cinemas were a myth until when the filmmakers overcame the barrier and started showing social aspects of the society.

b) Though the films have been made on social subjects for very long, the cinemas remained myth for a very long time.

c) The filmmakers did not want to make films on factual stories.

d) Both A and B

e) None of the above

Question 18: Why are cinemas called reflectors of society?

a) Because they give us entertainment and recreation.

b) Because they create awareness and impart knowledge to the audience.

c) Beacuse they enlighten the masses about the aspects of society which are, in general, not known to many.

d) Both B and C

e) None of the above

Instructions

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words are printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

In every society, art and politics do not always move along too well. While in some political circumstances art is considered as a tool for achieving certain political strategies, in other instances, art is viewed as an enemy of State. This is for two obvious reasons. The first reason is that, political activities like campaigns, rallies and other similar events make use of art forms like posters, printing of t-shirts, banners, bill boards etc, to achieve the maximum results in the set goals of such events. In this way, art is not just seen as tool for achieving political ends but also as a pure friend of politics because without it (art) politics would find it tough in expressing or communicating its interest to the public in a manner that would be easily understood. For example, the images of political aspirants made available in visual forms like posters and bill-boards bring the contestants closer to the people and also make the people to know those they are supporting even though such people, in most cases, never have the opportunity of meeting the aspirants one-on-one before elections.

Given this scenario, it is common for a person, group or community to identify with a political aspirant by simply wearing a printed cap or t-shirt with the image of the aspirant; or mounting a bill-board at the entrance of a community or at strategic locations within the capital city or its metropolis. In this way, art did not only provide a conducive link between the people and those seeking for political offices, but also provides channels under which the aspirants express their interest to the public during election’s season. All these make art a good friend to politics.

The second reason is somehow contrary to the first one. This is because when artists produced works that do not speak well of the policies of an existing government, political leaders consider art an enemy. For example, the cartoons in the newspaper dailies or other periodical publications draw on critical issues that affect the masses which government is refusing to give attention to. The images would be satirically represented to amuse and yet draw attention to an issue of critical need to the society. Political leaders in the helm of affairs do consider such cartoons or art works as a set up to sabotage their governments or regimes. Instead of considering such art forms as visual commentaries on the need to address or correct the ills in the society by formulating, implementing as well as actualizing good/workable policies for the benefit of the suffering masses, they view them the other way round.

Considering the two opposite sides presented above, art and politics are intermittently in conflict. This is because, where genuine art practice thrives, political leaders do not find it easy to manipulate or cheat the suffering masses without art leaking their evil plans. This is likely to be the reason why most governments or political regimes undermine the art sector for fear of not being used against it. In view of that, cultural policies which could bring a positive turn-around as well as foster the growth and development of art in a nation are either frustrated or given no attention. This is practically unhealthy not only for the progress of art and for the entire cultural development of a region. Art is an important element of culture and if it suffers, the culture of that region would also suffer irrecoverably.

Therefore, if art is important such that it can be used as strong tool or medium for achieving political aims in events like political campaigns and party rallies, it should be given appropriate recognition by political leaders who have the power to speed its growth through meaningful policies.

Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5910319

Question 19: Why does the author feel the need for greater recognition of art?

a) The conflict between art and politics is unhealthy for a country.

b) The deliberate ignorance of growth of art may eventually inflict the cultural development of a region.

c) Art helps in fostering strong cultural ties among the inhabitants of a region.

d) Art acts as an important tool to make the politicians accountable to the public.

e) None of these

Question 20: According to the passage, how does art suffer at the hands of politics?

a) The cultural growth of a region is disrupted because, of lack of attention to cultural policies.

b) Art is used to shield the real evil intentions of the politicians.

c) Art exposes the ill will of those in power thus enabling a greater accountability to public.

d) The growth of art is stifled by those in power for the fear of it acting as a weak spot in future.

e) None of these

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Answers & Solutions:

1) Answer (E)

Read the following lines “a solution that simultaneously illuminates what is wrong with our current way of thinking.” This is right before the billionaire is cited, so it is evident that his example is given to show what is wrong with our thinking. Option E is correct.

2) Answer (C)

Read the lines “Even if you are aware of war as a problem, you still may benefit from Mehta’s description of how technology, including artificial intelligence, is creating horrific new possibilities for wars worse than we’ve seen or even imagined.”
From these, it is evident that he recommends the book to teach them about new possibilities of war.

3) Answer (B)

Read the following lines “While many books spend their larger first section on a problem and a shorter concluding part on solutions, the first two-thirds of Mehta’s book is about solutions, the last third about the problem of war.” From this it is evident that the format change is the amount of book dedicated to solutions instead of problems, so Option B is the correct answer.

4) Answer (B)

In the first para, the author clearly mentions that although the government preaches the wars to had been fought out of compulsion but, at least one of them was such which could have been averted. Hence, option B.

5) Answer (C)

The most important factor that caused the war to translate into reality is mentioned in the last para. Option C captures this perfectly. Options A and D are mentioned in the passage but are not cited as primary reasons. Option B is out of the scope of the passage. Hence, option C is the answer.

6) Answer (B)

Options A and D are opposite of what is implied in the passage. Between B and C, B is a better option as it makes clear the reason behind colonist’s discontent. Hence,  option B is the correct choice.

7) Answer (D)

The word ‘believe’ must follow the preposition ‘in’. Hence, option D.

8) Answer (D)

Option A cannot be deduced from the passage. It is only mentioned that the founders believed so. But whether they deliberately deceived the public has no basis in the passage. Option B is nowhere mentioned in the passage. Similarly option C is not in the scope of the passage. From the second last para, last line option D can be deduced. Hence, option D.

9) Answer (C)

The concerned para states that the situation of negroes was such that although they were considered citizens equal with the Whites but, when it came to the rights and obligations they were not fairly treated. This is shown in option C. In option D, it is not given how the whites were treated for the same crime. So, we cannot infer anything. Option B shows their situation in a positive light and option A treats them equal with whites. Hence, option C is the correct choice.

10) Answer (A)

Credible means believable. Ingenuous means innocent. Lackadaisical means unenthusiastic. Doubtful means which cannot be trusted because of inconsistency. Option A fits best and hence, is the answer.

11) Answer (B)

There are two errors in the given sentence. The first one is the subject-verb agreement error. ‘Look’ verb has been used for ‘windows. So, it must be plural.
The second error is of parallelism. ‘Broader’, ‘richer’ must be followed by ‘deeper’.
Hence, option B is the correct answer.

12) Answer (D)

‘Overwhelmed’ means to bury or drown beneath a huge mass of something or to submerge.
Hence, option D is the correct answer.

13) Answer (C)

Option C can be inferred from the third paragraph.
Hence, option C is the correct answer.

14) Answer (A)

It has been mentioned in the last paragraph that the movie “Alluri Sita Rama Raju” was based on the life of a conducive personality who devoted himself to the independence of the country.
Hence, option A is the correct answer.

15) Answer (B)

‘The Shattered Illusion’ is the least expensive movie as mentioned in the fourth paragraph.
Hence, option B is the correct answer.

16) Answer (D)

The author has mentioned that cinemas are true reflectors of society. She goes on to give various examples to strengthen the same point. Thus, the main idea of the passage is option D.
Hence, option D is the correct answer.

17) Answer (E)

None of the above options can be inferred from the second paragraph.
It is not given that earlier the plots of cinemas were a myth. Options A and B are wrong.
Option C is nowhere mentioned in the paragraph.
Hence, option E is the correct answer.

18) Answer (D)

In the first paragraph, the author states that cinemas create awareness and education. Also, cinemas show us those aspects of our society which are either unknown or deliberately ignored.
Hence, option D is the correct answer.

19) Answer (B)

From the last two paragraphs it can be inferred that due to the lack of attention given to art because, of the possible effect it can have on Politicians, the cultural development of a region suffers. Cultural development being important necessitates the growth of art. Hence, option B is the correct choice.

20) Answer (D)

In para 4, it is mentioned that the government fears that the same art might be used against them as genuine art might spoil their evil plans and expose them. Hence, option D is the correct choice.

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